Casascius Physical Bitcoin Wallet Coin eBay

Partially redeeming a Casascius physical bitcoin - help request

Overview of problem
I have a Casascius physical bitcoin and I am unable to add its digital contents to a wallet. It seems that the key is not the right length or format. I started to get out of my depth with talk of things like a Minikey format.
I removed the hologram when I was given it years ago as I was curious what was under there. I don't want to sell it instead I want to add its 1 BTC value to a wallet so I can partially redeem it and keep the physical brass as a collectible.
What I have observed and tried (apologies in advance for butchering terms)
I've searched several sites, including here and haven't been able to find a current answer for the new style of keys and wallets.
I put the seven character code from the hologram into the casascius.uberbills dot com site and it gives me a 33 character key, tells me it's version 2 and confirms that it has a 1 BTC value
I've tried to import it into a Blockchain wallet but get the error "this private key does not match the watch only address above" when I enter the private key under the hologram. For some reason it seems like a different public address is generated when I enter the 33 char code.
I tried to import it into a Jaxx Liberty wallet but it doesn't recognise the minikey or 33 char code as valid.
I've basically run up against my level of knowledge and don't know what the next steps are of if I'm missing something bleeding obvious. I double and triple checked any data entry because I saw this was a common problem.
I'd really appreciate any help or pointers the community can give me.
Thanks
Edit:
Solution
I followed the advice given by u/murbul in reply to my post
You might struggle to find a wallet that natively supports MINI keys these days since it's an old format that never really took off apart from Casascius coins. So your best bet is to use a tool to convert it to a real private key (starting with 5) and import/sweep that into a wallet.
You can convert it on the Wallet Details tab of https://www.bitaddress.org/ - For 1 BTC I'd be paranoid enough to recommend downloading the source and doing everything offline: https://github.com/pointbiz/bitaddress.org
I used the site and one of the keys generated was one starting with '5' (Private Key WIF). I used this in Jaxx Liberty in the 'Paper Wallet Import' function under tools and it came right across.
I’m very happy.
submitted by PickledNumbat to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Could you build a wallet that simply sends a private key, bypassing all transaction time & costs?

The wallet would store btc in multiple addresses in reasonably small units, and then simply send over the private key via a secure protocol. The recipient then becomes the de facto owner without ever performing a transaction on the ledger.
submitted by tyrrannothesaurusrex to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Basic Bitcoin security guide

Hello,
This post is to give you a quick introduction into Bitcoin security. While nobody can guarantee you 100% security, I hope to mitigate some problems you can run into. This is the “20% of effort to get you to 80% safe”.
First of all, you have to determine how much money you want to hold in Bitcoin and how much effort are you willing to put in. If you are happy just holding a few dollars worth and don’t care if you lose them, that’s one approach to take. For everyone else, lets get started.
Password strength
A lot of the times how secure your money is will be determined by the strength of your password. Since in the worst case scenario we are talking about someone trying to brute force your wallet, casual online passwords are too weak. Under 10 characters is too weak. Common words and phrases are too weak. Adding one number to a password at the end is too weak.
Moreover, you can consider your password much weaker if you:
If you want a really strong password:
Wallet security
Now we are getting to the meat of things.
There are a number of wallets available to store your hard earned bitcoins. If you have a decent amount of coins to store, you should look into software wallets - BitcoinQT, MultiBit, Armory or Electrum. They are among the best place to store your money safely (provided your computer is secure as well). Chose one you think best suits you, install it and encrypt your wallet file with your strong password. You should take your wallet file and back it up (location of the file is different for different clients, so you have to do some research as to where to find that file). Back it up on a CD, safe USB drive or the like. Keep them safe. If you lose that file, you will lose your money.
A quick word on deterministic wallets. Electrum and Armory allow you to create wallets from a seed. If you use the same seed later, you can recreate your wallet on other machines. With deterministic wallets, you only need to keep that seed secure to have access to your money.
In comparison, in BitcoinQT's traditional wallet, every address you use is random, meaning that after you send 50-100 outgoing transactions your backups can be obsolete. Always keep an up-to-date backup of such wallet file if possible.
Okay, sometimes you need to have your Bitcoins with you when you leave your computer. In this case, you should look into either online or mobile wallets. A staple for both of those is Blockchain.info, but there are others to chose from.
A good rule of thumb with these is to not store more money in them than you can afford to lose. They are best used as a convenient way of accessing some money, not storing your savings. Online wallets are especially vulnerable to their servers getting hacked and people’s money getting stolen.
What to keep in mind while using online wallets:
  • Use a secure password (the more money you have in them the stronger the password should be)
  • Always keep a backup of your wallet in case you need to recover your money
  • Whenever possible, enable two factor authentication
  • Don’t use your online wallets from unsafe computers
Cold storage
Sometimes you want to store your bitcoins for a long time in a safe place. This is called “cold storage”. There are a few ways one can do this.
First of all, paper wallets. They are nice for giving people small bitcoin gifts, but also for long-term storage if properly used. What you want to do is generate and print them offline. You can save the linked page for example and run that offline. If you are really paranoid, you can put it on read-only media and access that from a different computer. For really long term storage, use archival-grade paper.
Another approach to take is using a separate computer for storing your money that is offline 99+% of the time. You could set one up easily by buying an old laptop, reformatting it, installing Linux and a Bitcoin client. Generate an address on that machine and send money to it from your main wallet. Depending on how paranoid you are you can connect that computer to the Internet afterwards to synchronize data with the Bitcoin Network and then turn it off and put it away somewhere safe until it’s needed.
Brain wallets
Don’t. They are not for you. Unless you are a security-conscientious programmer, those are not for you.
Diversifying
Keeping all of your eggs in one basket is never a good thing. You should look into diversifying some of your Bitcoin assets in case your other storage methods fail. Some ways you can diversify:
  • Buy a physical Bitcoin. As long as you trust the coin creator such coins can be an effective cold storage
  • Invest - I wouldn’t recommend this for more than some trivial amount unless you know what you are doing, but investing in some Bitcoin stocks could be a way to get more money out of your bitcoins
How not to diversify:
  • Avoid keeping your bitcoins at exchanges or other online sites that are not your online wallets. Such sites can be closed down or disappear along with your money.
  • Alt-coins - there are few cryptocurrencies that are worthwhile, but most of them are just Bitcoin clones. If a currency brings nothing new, it’s worthless in comparison to Bitcoin. Namecoin is a distributed domain name server (although recently it had a fatal flaw uncovered, so be warned), Ripple is a distributed currency exchange and payment system. Litecoin will only be useful in case Bitcoin’s hashing algorithm gets compromised (very unlikely at this time). Beyond that there are few if any alt-coins that are a worthwhile way of diversifying.
Accepting payments and safety
We’ve covered safe ways to store money, now a quick note about bitcoin payments and their safety.
First of all, when you are sending a transaction, pay your fees. Transactions without fees can take forever to propagate, confirm and clear. This can cause you a lot of stress, so pay your fees.
Secondly, when accepting large Bitcoin payments (say you want to suddenly cash in a gold bar into bitcoins), wait for at the very least 1 confirmation on those transactions. 6 is best, but having even 1 confirmations is a lot better than having none. This is mainly a rule of thumb for the paranoid (I wouldn’t be doing this for most casual transaction), but maybe it will save you if you are dealing with some shady people.
Wrapping up...
That should cover the basics. If you want to read more about Bitcoin’s security in general, here is my master thesis on the subject. A lot of questions about Bitcoin and security have also been answered on Bitcoin StackExchange - be sure to check it out.
Comments and improvement suggestions welcome.
EDITS:
  • Removed link to insecure site
  • Removed random article section
  • Added information about deterministic wallets
submitted by ThePiachu to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Hi Departments of Financial Services, Here is the proposed Virtual Currency Regulator Application

In developing this regulatory framework, we have sought to strike an appropriate balance that helps protect individuals, consumers, businesses, services, and innovators, while rooting out unscrupulous and over-reaching regulatory activity. These regulations include provisions to help safeguard customer assets, protect against unwarranted account freezes or seizures, and prevent the regulatory abuse of virtual currencies from unethical activity, such as widespread warrantless monitoring, disclosure of private information, dictation as to how users engaged in P2P or non-fiat transfers can spend their money, and scapegoating.
We recognize that not everyone in the regulatory community will be pleased about the prospect of what could be seen as a barrier to their regulatory authority. Ultimately, though, we believe that setting up common sense rules of the road is vital to the long-term future of the virtual currency industry, as well as the safety and soundness of customer assets. (We think the situation in New York, for example, made that very clear.) Moreover, given that P2P decentralized networks are stateless, headless, community consensus driven bodies, we also have a moral obligation to move forward on this framework.
Entities are considered "interested in regulating virtual currencies" if:
... in a manner that would affect any current or prospective member of the human race.
Entities "interested in regulating virtual currencies" must:
As the first decentralized community to put forward specially tailored rules for virtual currency regulators – continued public feedback will be an important part of finalizing this regulatory framework. We look forward to carefully and thoughtfully reviewing public comments on our proposal.
submitted by Try_AgainNY to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

There is a 30 day comment period for the current Bitlicense proposal. Unless there are substantial changes, New York will be a Bitcoin dead zone

The 30 day comment period starts next week. Bitlicense, as proposed will force most companies that store customer BTC deposits to block New York IP addresses. There is very little chance that Lawsky will make any further changes to it, so what will this mean for Bitcoin around the world?
EDIT, as a reminder:
This is how the Bitlicense will affect Bitcoin businesses, taken from here:
http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/2aycxs/hi_this_is_ben_lawsky_at_nydfs_here_are_the/cizyqyz
(I've added modifications in light of changes in the new proposal and information that I found was missing in the original write-up)
Entities are considered dealing in virtual currencies if:
.. to any resident in New York. Web services, even those incorporated overseas, must either comply or block access for NY users. (200.2n)
Entities 'dealing in virtual currency' must:
Added:
The (only?) good news: Merchants do not need a BitLicense to accept Bitcoin for a good or service. (200.3c2).
> This post was created for general guidance, and does not constitute legal advice. You should not act upon the information contained in this publication without obtaining specific advice from a professional. No representation or warranty (expressed or implied) is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this post.
EDIT 2, targetpro suggested expressing any concerns you may have about the proposed regs to the NY Dept. of Finan. Services:
submitted by aminok to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

'What's wrong with my current cold storage method?' - an examination of potential weaknesses in the most common cold storage methods

Today we are going to discuss cold storage and some specific problems with cold storage. While this applies directly to the Secret Key portion of a key-pair; it also applies to the seed used to back up HD wallets and hardware wallets.
The best way to keep you seed/secret key safe is to have multiple copies in multiple locations perhaps with multiple formats and even better if the keys are split. However not everyone has access to multiple locations, or access to land long term, or more than one place to store their things. This is an examination of faults with individual methods; and not a comprehensive plan, obviously.
Not to say everything is all bad but there are many potential weakness out there, and some in the Bitcoin and crypto community like to know the edge cases of things.
I will also highlight some of the aspects of the Keyois Capsule which is a 'physical bitcoin'.
A physical Bitcoin is a cryptographic key pair, a physical key printed and affixed to what has always been before a coin. The first physical bitcoin coin was the Casascius coin, since then the world of physical bitcoin coins has blossomed as a fun part of the Bitcoin world.
We will focus on mediums relating to cold storage and not ones designed for more everyday use, but this applies to the seed you save to keep your everyday spending wallets safe and backed up.
We will assume you generated your keys securely and that you already have them on some medium. We will also have to ignore endpoint physical security because they can all be carried away the same. Remember your cell phone /hardware wallet/ computer client are only as good as where you put the backup seed phrase, which can be thought of as data much like the SK discussed below.
Written on a piece of paper
Printed on a piece of paper
On laminated paper
Engraved / etched/ ablated/ stamped on a piece of metal
Stored digitally on a computer
Stored digitally on CD, floppy disk, laserdisc, or mini-disc
Stored digitally on a flash drive
Backups are essential for digital data Computer code for performing operations can be corrupted in transfer or in operation. Special systems exist and procedures help data to last longer. For ideas, see this archive.gov page Remember to store in multiple locations. You can lose everything in single structure
A physical bitcoin coin
**What can solve most of these problems? A combination of good backup procedures and encryption. **
If you have permeant access to more than one location (people who live in big cities, without family or cars have a hard time with this) or have people you trust with your money (don't) then look into using some form of Multi-signature option.
The Keyois Capsule is a crypto piggy bank; it can be funded from the outside but you to break it open to get them out. You give me a BIP38 encrypted key pair (well the address not the public key) and I engrave it in this tamper evident and time resistant package. You still have to hold on to the pass phrase that allows you to decrypt it; that is however the same problem as all methods with BIP38 encryption. How to store this without having to trust anyone but still being assured of it's security?
  • Engraving, embossing, or stamping on a sheet of metal is one option; however the metals that are easiest to stamp are ones that melt in a house fire. They could be put in a glass jar that's filled with aerogel and buried. These is the best readily available option for most people but it really can be tedious. - This puts you back at anyone who can see it can steal it so dip in plastic dip, wrap in duct tape, bake in clay, encase in concrete, whatever just don't leave unencrypted keys visible!
  • The cryptosteel is another ready-made option
  • Have the words etched onto glass at home with off the shelf products; but be carful of this idea because the glass can shatter from impact and heat or even sudden temperature changes
  • Anodize the words yourself on a pieces of metal, there used to be a service to help use your home printer to print the words with some chemicals you can buy
  • Bake them in clay, then encase that in epoxy resin so it can't shatter. then paint the outside, in the future you can solvent the paint off and see the written seed
  • Use a combination of techniques to split the seed so that it is safe(because split and separated) and redundant (because backed up).
The most cost effective way for a 'normal' person (without their own land, without more than one location, and who cannot trust anyone else with their funds) to keep their backup seed/ secret key safe from damage from the elements would probably to buy a stamping kit and hammer and some stainless steel sheet or bar, Aluminium can be okay if you have the right alloy but better safe than sorry.
submitted by ProfBitcoin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Cash and Casascius Coins

So I have a question. Casascius coins are phisical bitcoins with a holgram / sealed into the back of them. They are really nice objects available in several denominations and you can discover the bitcoin deposit address for these coins. They may or may not be available new right now (I think not) so far as I know all or most were issued before 1/82017 the fork date.
Now I can send BTC to the deposit deposit address for any coin and check it with the block explorer, And I can also check the BCH balance, which given that these coins have their holograms in tact, have 1 BCH and 1BTC on them. More if I have sent additional BTC funds. In my view these are lovely objects, like a piggy bank, that can be broken apart at a time of need and spent by the owner. Now I can still send BTC to these addresses, but so far as I am aware replay protection would prevent me sending BCH. Is this true? It would seem a terrible shame, and if you believe that BCH will be the one true Bitcoin, we need a way to do this.
Any thoughts or suggestions?
Of course the same question could be asked about Bitcoin Gold. Personally I dont much rate the chances of Bitcoin Gold, but that aside, can I send BTG to an old BTC address such as a Casascius with a good expectation that I would be able to recover it in the future by sweeping with a BTG wallet?
submitted by mintymark to btc [link] [comments]

'What is wrong with my current cold storage method' - an examination of potential weaknesses in the most common cold storage methods

Today we are going to discuss cold storage and some specific problems with cold storage. While this applies directly to the Secret Key portion of a key-pair; it also applies to the seed used to back up HD wallets and hardware wallets.
Not to say everything is all bad but there are many potential weakness out there, and some in the Bitcoin and crypto community like to know the edge cases of things.
I will also highlight some of the aspects of the Keyois Capsule which is a 'physical bitcoin'.
A physical Bitcoin is a cryptographic key pair, a physical key printed and affixed to what has always been before a coin. The first physical bitcoin coin was the Casascius coin, since then the world of physical bitcoin coins has blossomed as a fun part of the Bitcoin world.
We will focus on mediums relating to cold storage and not ones designed for more everyday use, but this applies to the seed you save to keep your everyday spending wallets safe and backed up.
We will assume you generated your keys securely and that you already have them on some medium. We will also have to ignore endpoint physical security because they can all be carried away the same. Remember your cell phone /hardware wallet/ computer client are only as good as where you put the backup seed phrase, which can be thought of as data much like the SK discussed below.
Written on a piece of paper
Printed on a piece of paper
On laminated paper
Engraved / etched/ ablated/ stamped on a piece of metal
Stored digitally on a computer
Stored digitally on CD, floppy disk, laserdisc, or mini-disc
Stored digitally on a flash drive
Backups are essential for digital data Computer code for performing operations can be corrupted in transfer or in operation. Special systems exist and procedures help data to last longer. For ideas, see this archive.gov page Remember to store in multiple locations. You can lose everything in single structure
A physical bitcoin coin
What can solve most of these problems? A combination of good backup procedures and encryption.
If you have permeant access to more than one location (people who live in big cities, without family or cars have a hard time with this) or have people you trust with your money (don't) then look into using some form of Multi-signature option.
The Keyois Capsule is a crypto piggy bank; it can be funded from the outside but you to break it open to get them out. You give me a BIP38 encrypted key pair (well the address not the public key) and I engrave it in this tamper evident and time resistant package. You still have to hold on to the pass phrase that allows you to decrypt it; that is however the same problem as all methods with BIP38 encryption. How to store this without having to trust anyone but still being assured of it's security?
  • Engraving, embossing, or stamping on a sheet of metal is one option; however the metals that are easiest to stamp are ones that melt in a house fire. They could be put in a glass jar that's filled with aerogel and buried. These is the best readily available option for most people but it really can be tedious.
  • The cryptosteel is another ready-made option
  • Have the words etched onto glass at home with off the shelf products; but be carful of this idea because the glass can shatter from impact and heat or even sudden temperature changes
  • Anodize the words yourself on a pieces of metal, there used to be a service to help use your home printer to print the words with some chemicals you can buy
  • Bake them in clay, then encase that in epoxy resin so it can't shatter. then paint the outside, in the future you can solvent the paint off and see the written seed
  • Use a combination of techniques to split the seed so that it is safe(because split and separated) and redundant (because backed up).
Characters stamped on Aluminium is probably the most cost effective way to keep a secret key or seed safe from fire and rot.
submitted by ProfBitcoin to btc [link] [comments]

How should I sell my Casascius coin?

I have a 2013 1BTC Casascius coin that I am looking to sell, I put a trade up on local bitcoins, but since I don't have any BTC in my wallet currently it assumes that I don't have any to sell. When in reality I have the physical coin with the hologram intact, and the bitcoin address still available for access. What are my best options?
submitted by nagurnimaster to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

casascius bitcoin - leave alone or put in wallet

I have a casascius bitcoin. Should I peel the hologram, and move the address into a wallet ... or leave it alone?
I have no plans to use it ... just watching it grow.
submitted by joej to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

An Ark: Bitcoin marketplace with trust-free escrow

Hi Reddit!

Introduction

We all know that we should never trust bitcoins to sites with hotwallets, but up until now there has not been a good way to do trades without one. Multi-sig promises to deliver trust-free escrow, but so far it has been difficult to make widely accessible due to wallet fragmentation and a confusing user experience.
After doing some research, I discovered that we could make a much more user-friendly system that is functional today while still achieving trust-free escrow similar to multi-sig. The alternate method we are using is called the Casascius Escrow Scheme and it was invented by Mike Caldwell. You can read about it here: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/User:Casascius/Escrow_scheme_draft It is similar to Shamir's secret sharing, but it was specifically designed for escrow. The javascript implementation can be found at www.bitescrow.org (this is what I used).
Using this scheme we are able to perform escrow functions (like refunds) while never actually touching the bitcoins. There is no hot-wallet, meaning funds cannot be lost or stolen from our servers. Keys are generated separately in each user's browser and on the server in a way that prevents the server from ever having all the keys needed to spend the bitcoins. In fact, once the seller accepts a purchase request, the entire transaction can be completed offline by manually exchanging escrow codes with the other party.
This method is trustfree because all the important code is client-side and can be reviewed. Additionally, all the HTTP requests can be examined to ensure there is no sensitive data being passed to the server.

Pros and Cons

The major limitation of this method is that partial refunds from escrow are not possible, the escrow address is winner-take-all fund. Also, the transaction types cannot be very complex.
On the other hand, there's no sending long and confusing blocks of text back and forth to be deciphered and signed. There's no worrying about how to publish your transaction to the bitcoin network, and there's no waiting for confirms. You can load the private key into your wallet (wif) and see the funds immediately.

Usage

So we went ahead and created a basic market place around this escrow system. Making an account is as easy as signing up with an email. The email you sign up with WILL BE SHARED with users you contact, or users who request to purchase your listing. For security reasons, we do not want to handle user communications at this time. We want to focus on providing the most secure marketplace and would encourage you to find alternate channels of communication beyond email if needed.
Every time you create or accept a transaction, you must make an Escrow Transaction Password. This password protects the sensitive bits of the transaction from the server, meaning if you lose it you will have to release the escrow funds to the other party. If both people lose it, the funds in the escrow address will be lost.
Right now we are looking for feedback and have made no decisions about account limits or pricing. Currently the system is 100% free to use. Please let us know your thoughts! If you have any questions, concerns, or ideas just reply to this thread or email [email protected] and I will get back to you asap.
https://www.anark.re - Buy and sell anything including fiat, real estate, and more!
Bitcointalk: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=520047.0
submitted by firepacket to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Want some personalized vanity addresses for your currency of choice? Check out Vanity Pool

I run a small project called Vanity Pool, it lets you outsource generation of cool vanity addresses through a split-key address algorithm - this means that your private key and thus your money is secure, even though other people mined for your address. This also means that you can get some nice vanity addresses and not have to spend a lot of your GPU time mining for the address instead of mining for your coin of choice.
So if you want some cool vanity address, like DDogeWowAA2EFcGmipzDjQBYQFXiqC8QFs or 1PiachuEVn6sh52Ez7o6Fymvw54qvQ4RBm , head on over to https://vanitypool.appspot.com/ , request a pattern you wish created (shorter patterns area cheaper and take a lot less time to generate), put in a public key that you own (you will need to use it later), when asked for network prefix, put in the decimal version of your coin-specific net-byte. Afterwards, you will be requested to pay a bounty in BTC (creating coin-specific pool would make the mining power a lot smaller; miners prefer being paid in BTC). After the payment is confirmed, any miner connected to the pool will start looking for the solution to your pattern.
Once you have the solution, either use Casascius' Address Utility, or head on over to our online tool (use coin-specific hex NetByte and hex Prefix Byte). After that you can import your new vanity address to your client by going through those steps (example using Dogecoin client).
Have fun!
submitted by ThePiachu to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Help Numisalis Physical Bitcoin get off the ground

Hey everyone! I just started an Indiegogo campaign to get my company, Numisalis, off the ground. I want to make a physical bitcoin that addresses many of the issues I see in the physical bitcoin market.
Indiegogo campaign
Numisalis web site
The overarching issue I see is that physical bitcoin are not tradable. They are collector's items, they are non-durable, or they are both. Here is a list of problems and what I am doing to resolve them:
I have been involved with Bitcoin for over 2 1/2 years. I am a huge advocate and I think the protocol is pretty great as it is. But I also believe physical bitcoin is valuable and extremely healthy for the bitcoin ecosystem.
I have a friend who purchased a bitcoin from me. He asked if he could just take one of my Casascius coins. I told him it would cost him a lot more than he paid me. He is a programmer but does not want to manage his own digital assets and I really can't blame him. This project is a response to that situation. I want people like him to have a reasonable option for making physical transactions.
Why am I doing an Indiegogo campaign for fiat? I thought about fundraising with bitcoin. I don't mind the "hassle" of converting bitcoin to fiat to pay suppliers who don't take bitcoin, but delayed payment does not work well with bitcoin. If the price drops and I can't pay for supplies and the project is sidelined that is not fair to my customers. If the price spikes I don't think it is fair to my customers if I profit off my luck at their expense. Bitcoin is great for instant payment. But not delayed payment. When the campaign is over and I will only take orders through my website I will only take payment in bitcoin.
Aren't you worried about what happened with Casascius and FinCen? FinCen deals with money laundering. I will not be charging your coins with bitcoin for you. I will be taking payment for a cold storage solution. I will provide a script for creating a proper transaction to charge the coins I sent, but you will be charging them with your own bitcoin.
Why do I need to raise money? Why not just take orders? There is a large up front cost when producing plastics. This campaign takes care of that and the costs of the first run of coins. Once that is complete everything will run as orders from my website.
submitted by bitscavenger to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Game-Theory: Bitcoin Security Scenarios - Scenario 1-6

Bitcoin theft scenarios I will make a series of real-world examples of bitcoin thefts to illustrate the threat-vectors and attack surfaces most people may be exposed to. This is a community participation article - If I have something wrong or am missing something - please comment with your idea. Im not a security expert. I just have some spare-time and an engaging idea of making scenarios everyone can understand.
SCENARIO 1 - The Trusted Party
You have been diligently buying and holding bitcoins. You have taken any precaution you can to ensure that your bitcoins are safe.
You have chosen from the available options (below):
# Storage Personal/ 3rd party/+ Attack Vectors Attack Surface Surface Hardening
1 Printed Cold-wallet Personal Deception, Rubber-hose, Physical theft The physical wallet, equipment used for creation of wallet (printer), entropy engine, source code ex: bitaddress.org Bip-38, Physical Protection, Vault storage
2 Physical Coin (Casascius) Personal Deception, Rubber-hose, Physical theft The physical wallet (coin), equipment used for creation of wallet (printer), entropy engine, manufacturer risk, tampering Bip-38, Physical Protection, Vault storage
3 Cold-Wallet computer Personal Hack, Rubber-hose, Physical theft, USB stick malware Wireless access incl. Bluetooth, Internet access, physical access Air-gap, Physical Protection, disconnection from any network, vault protection, disk encryption
4 Coinbase 3rd Party Hack (Man in the middle, keystroke logger), Govt. & criminal controls (Coercion), Deception Coinbase servers, your compute access point 2FA, virtual keyboard, Coinbase vault
5 Blockchain.info Personal + Hack (Man in the middle, keystroke logger), Deception your compute access point 2FA, virtual keyboard
6 Hard-wallet (Trezor) Personal Deception, Rubber-hose, Physical theft Hard-wallet device + computer with soft-wallet + PIN, Seed vault protection
But the thief in this scenario is a trusted individual (family member, business partner, trusted friend). Lets run through the scenarios
Scenario 1.1
A. The thief has stolen your paper wallets
The community is welcome to run any of the other scenarios.
Game on!
submitted by luckdragon69 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Building a United Platform

No matter which coin you're backing (or how many), the regulations coming out of New York State have large, overreaching and severe consequences for all cryptocurrencies.
You can read the proposed BitLicense Regulations here.
AmericanBitcoin has put together a TL;DR of the proposed reglations
In response, you can read the in-progress GitHub Fork of those same regulations here.
If you'd like to see a quick breakdown of examples of what's wrong with the proposed regulations, I highly recommend you read this comment by MrMadden over in /Bitcoin, which is utterly fantastic.
Instead of standing 'against' these regulations, let's stand for:
The problems, right now:
These regulations are vague in some important areas and could have unintended consequences.
For example, here's a great breakdown from goldcakes (originally made here)
Entities are considered dealing in virtual currencies if:
.. to any resident in New York. Web services, even those incorporated overseas, must either comply or block access for NY users. (200.2n)
Entities 'dealing in virtual currency' must:
The (only?) good news: Merchants do not need a BitLicense to accept Bitcoin for a good or service. (200.3c2).
This post was created for general guidance, and does not constitute legal advice. You should not act upon the information contained in this publication without obtaining specific advice from a professional. No representation or warranty (expressed or implied) is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this post.
submitted by GoodShibe to CryptosUnited [link] [comments]

[BOUNTY BONUS. Level: CODER] Review the source code for the Printer tool

Skills required: Github, C#
Clone the Github repo and dig into the source code in the Printer folder.
Note that there are a lot of forms in the Forms folder, but only "frmPrototype" and "TemplateEditor" are my original creations. All the others (which are not included in the Visual Studio Project file any more) are from the Bitcoin Address Utility project which this is built on top of. Equally, all of the really clever code in the Model folder, which does all the cryptography stuff, is stuff I inherited. Modifications were made to both the old forms and some of the Model classes to make that utility multi-coin-ready.
As with the request for code-review of the Loader tool, please check for signs of impropriety on my part. Of course I'm going to say "I haven't put anything in there to leak the private keys for your paper wallets" - consider this an invitation to get paid for looking!
Output: Please leave specific comments in this thread.
Reward: From Ð100 for comments which indicate you've had a quick look at the source, up to Ð2000 for greater depth and detail. Possibly even more, if you spot a big problem I hadn't thought of.
submitted by BuxtonTheRed to walletprint [link] [comments]

[WTS] Physical Dogecoins from Spain that contain their Face Value of 10,000 DOGE! Only 500 Minted! Plus Shibanu Dogecoins from the EU <500 Minted!

EDIT: 10/9/15 - I have updated the listing as 2 of the coins have been Sold. There are still 3 of the Crypto Imperator 10,000 DOGE coins left that are truly some beautiful coins, and each contain their Face Value/Denomination of 10,000 Dogecoins, yet any amount can be sent to its address and the coin used as a secure cold storage wallet. Their holograms are Visually Stunning!
Check my personal Limited Edition #95 CI 10,000 Dogecoin graded MS67 by ANACS in the photo album; it is a beautiful coin! It is the last 2 pictures; the very last pic is a duplicate and not the MS67.
Verification and More Pictures (Sorry the verification date is a few days old; I took the pictures and planned on listing them but it was a pretty hectic week)
Click for Full Size/Higher Resolution!
Hey guys, I have a huge collection of physical Bitcoins & other physical cryptos (such as these physical Dogecoins), and I'm selling a few extras. I love all coins in general, but these are my favorite to collect closely followed by old world silver coinage & Norfed Liberty Dollars.
Here is some of my feedback from Reddit sales
Here is my eBay profile with 100% Feedback
Here is my BitcoinTalk profile, where I have probably had the most dealings (Click on "Trust" to see Feedback)
(4 3 Available) Crypto Imperator 10,000 Dogecoins, and some background info. below:
Price per Crypto Imperator 10,000 Dogecoin -- $24
First coming out of Spain in 2014, the 10,000 Dogecoin Series were the first coins ever released by Crypto Imperator, now an established and respected manufacturer of physical crypto coins. With a very low mintage of only 500 coins, some excellent minting strikes, and beautifully complex security holograms, these coins were a hit from the start and quickly sold out. The first wallet-type physical Dogecoins ever minted, each coin contains its face value of 10,000 Dogecoins.
The zinc-alloy 10,000 Dogecoin was first released in June 2014 and is 39mm in diameter with a thickness of 3mm. The denomination on the face of the coin is "10,000 DOGE", and each coin was funded with that amount of Dogecoins by the creator. An appealing yet complex tamper-evident security hologram covers the private key to a unique Dogecoin address containing the coin's funds. The coin can be funded with any amount of extra Dogecoin by the buyer if desired, and can be used as a secure cold storage Dogecoin wallet. If you are ever ready to spend the funds contained within the coin, simply peel the hologram off of the coin to reveal the private key, which you can then import into your Dogecoin wallet of choice (however this will probably reduce the value of the coin as a collectible).
The obverse of the coin features a large centered portrait of a shiba inu dog, the dog breed famous for the "Doge" internet memes and the cryptocurrency Dogecoin. Next to the 'Shibe' is the word "Wow" written in the appropriately chosen font of 'Comic Sans'. Above the Doge portrait reads the slogan, "in shibes we trust", and on the bottom of the coin the denomination "10,000 DOGE" is stamped.
On the coin's reverse is the manufacturer's name "CryptoImperator" across the top and its year of minting "2014" along the bottom, the two sets of writing separated by a beautiful floral print that goes up both sides like a vine. In the center of the coin the tamper-evident security hologram is placed, covering up the coin's private key. Crypto Imperator's hologram is one of the best; there are so many different layers in it and each has a different look depending on which angle it is viewed from (which is why I included so many different pictures). Among the different features that can be seen in the hologram are the words "Crypto Imperator Original", a rocket flying to the moon with the words "To The Moon" present, and a Roman-type figure above 2 pillars and the words "Crypto Imperator". In the center of the hologram a small window is cutout, showing the first 8 characters, or 'First Bits', of the coin's Dogecoin address.
SOLD! (1 Available) Shibanu 50,000 Dogecoin (Un-Funded, DIY physical Dogecoin) and some background info. below:
Price for the Shibanu Dogecoin -- $24 SOLD!
The very first coin released in September 2015 by Shibanu (a new physical crypto coin maker), the Shibanu 50,000 Dogecoin coin is a DIY physical Dogecoin. Each purchase includes 1 coin in a protective flip, and 1 tamper-evident security hologram (for placing a private key and assembling the coin if you choose to do so). This coin has a beautiful gold-plated finish that just shines and pictures do not do it justice.
The Shibanu 50,000 DOGE coin was first released in early September 2015 and is 38mm in diameter with a thickness of 2.5mm, composed of Zinc Alloy with a beautiful and lustrous Gold-Plated finish. The recommended denomination on the face of the coin is 50,000 DOGE, but these coins are unfunded as they were originally sold, and any amount of Dogecoin can be loaded onto them if desired. They can be used as a secure cold storage Dogecoin wallet if you choose to print and place a private key and assemble the coin with one of the tamper-evident security holograms. Please note that these coins are sold unfunded, and do not contain or come with any actual digital Dogecoin value. If you are ever ready to spend the funds contained within the coin (if you've assembled & funded it), simply peel the hologram off of the coin to reveal the private key, which you can then import into your Dogecoin wallet of choice. (This concept can be confusing, just ask if you have any questions!)
The obverse of the coin features the word "SHIBANU" stamped across the top, representing its maker, with "50000 DOGE" (representing its suggested denomination, or face value) stamped across the bottom. A large "D" is stamped into the center, with a Shiba Inu dog leaning on the top, which represents the Doge meme. To the left and right of the large "D" are the phrases "Multus Moneta" and "Multus Fortuna", which roughly translate from Latin to English as "Much Money" and "Much Fortune". The large "D" in the center also has an X pattern behind it, and those surfaces are smooth and shiny strikes, while the background has a nice contrasting textured strike.
The reverse features the word "DOGECOIN" stamped across the top in an arched fashion with the year of issue "2015" stamped across the bottom. There is an indented circular area in the center on the reverse, where a private key can be placed and covered with the provided Shibanu tamper-evident security hologram, if you choose to assemble it and/or use it as a cold storage Dogecoin wallet. Shibanu's first holograms are very appealing on the eye with many different elements, layers, and colors, depending on which angle the coin is viewed from. They feature a repeating "SHIBANU" logo in the background with a dog's paw prints and a rocket heading to the moon in the center, which has a letter "D" and the maker's name "Shibanu". There is also a small window cut out in the center of the hologram so that the coin's "First Bits", or first 8 letters of a Dogecoin address, can be viewed to verify funds contained within.
These coins are DIY (Do It Yourself) physical Dogecoins and as such are sold as unfunded kits containing 1 coin and 1 tamper-evident security hologram. The positive aspect of buying a DIY physical Dogecoin is that you don't have to trust anyone with the private keys to your Dogecoin addresses (and Dogecoin funds). With your coin, your wallet's security will be in your own hands if you choose to generate, print, and place a private key within your coin. The tamper-evident security holograms are designed in a way that if somebody gained access to your physical coin and pulled off the hologram to access your private key, it would be obvious it had been compromised due to a visible honeycomb pattern left across the back of your coin. It is your choice if you want to print a private key and assemble your coin, or leave it un-assembled as it is sold. If you need help or have any questions about generating and printing private keys for your coin, just let us know and we will send you some helpful resources and instructions.
Payment Info.- Bitcoin and/or PayPal Friends & Family highly preferred at the moment (Please leave note/comment line blank if paying with PP F&F) but will also accept PP Goods & Services (add 3% to your total). Also, I almost forgot to add- I will also definitely accept Dogecoins as payment for these physical Dogecoins!
Shipping Info.- $2.25 for basic, tracked shipping in the US via First Class Parcel (no matter if you buy 1 or all 5 coins); this will be extremely well-packaged in a bubble mailer and comes with tracking and delivery confirmation for free. If you want Priority 2-Day (which includes $50 insurance), just add $5 to your total.
Always willing to ship international at cost, and can do so very affordably. PM if interested in buying overseas.
Also- I package very securely & discretely, and drop off each package by hand- so once it's shipped you own it unless you want to pay extra for insurance. I will say though I have never had a package lost out of hundreds (knock on wood..)
About Physical Bitcoins/other cryptos:
In 2011 a man named Mike Caldwell, an avid supporter of cryptography and Bitcoin, had an idea to mint physical coins that could represent digital Bitcoin value in a more conventional way, so that more people would be able to conceptualize and understand this new digital cryptocurrency technology. He came up with a way to mint a physical coin that actually contained the digital Bitcoin value it represented. On one side of the coin, he had a recessed groove stamped into it. He then securely and safely generated new Bitcoin address public & private keys, printing the private keys (needed to spend the funds) and placing them in the recessed groove. He then had complex & layered tamper-evident holograms created to cover the private key, which served 2 purposes: 1- these complex holograms made it harder to ever create a believable counterfeit of his coins, and 2- when the holograms were peeled back exposing the private key needed to spend the funds, it left a honeycomb pattern behind, which would instantly tell someone considering buying one on the 2nd market whether the coin still contained its valuable BTC funds, or if it had been spent. He called his coins Casascius physical Bitcoins, and they proved to be very popular, with several different denominations and Series released over a couple years' time. Today these coins are highly valued & sought after collectors' items. Many individuals, groups, and companies followed suit in the years that followed, designing and minting their own physical crypto coins. And that's where we are today with these coins I have for sale. :) I tried my best to explain how physical Bitcoins/Dogecoins/etc. work in a limited space, but it is hard to fully summarize such a topic in so few words, so if you have any questions just ask!
This can all sound so complicated and confusing to someone unfamiliar with Dogecoin/cryptocurrencies and how they work. If you have any questions about these coins or Dogecoin in general, please reach out to me via a message and I would be glad to help you out!
Thanks for Reading!
submitted by snarlpill to Coins4Sale [link] [comments]

Accepting Credit Cards for Bitcoins. How about delayed activation?

Would this work? (I have accidentally posted this to bitcoinDE/ before. If you subscribe to both subs, sorry for the duplicate)
  1. Customer (C) orders a paper wallet (PW) or somerthing similar to bitcard or casascius coins from a website, the vendor (V).
  2. Customer pays in fiat, i.e. by wire transfer or credit/debit card.
  3. Vendors ships PW physically, with a note stating the wallet is worthless unless "activated".
  4. C confirms that they received the PW. In other words, C starts the "activation" of the wallet.
  5. V funds the wallet or completes the "activation" after a certain time has passed, say 24 hours for transactions that are not reversable under normal circumstances or 6 weeks for credit cards, which are prone to charge backs.
  6. If something funny happens, i.e. chargebacks, V invalidates the paper wallet by publicly declaring that this address will never be funded. If C fails to start the activation within a reasonable time frame, the PW is assumed lost (e.g.) and invalidated. C gets a refund or another PW.
If C is willing to trust V, they can invest in bitcoin relatively hassle-free, no exchanges, no verification; just like only shopping. If C does not want to spend the coins immediately, the delay is not an issue. V can sell bitcoins and related products to a huge market.
What do you think? Bit-Card?
submitted by shallnotwastetime to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What is wrong with my current cold storage method?

Today we are going to discuss cold storage and some specific problems with cold storage. While this applies directly to the Secret Key portion of a key-pair; it also applies to the seed used to back up HD wallets and hardware wallets.
The best way to keep you seed/secret key safe is to have multiple copies in multiple locations perhaps with multiple formats and even better if the keys are split. However not everyone has access to multiple locations, or access to land long term, or more than one place to store their things. This is an examination of faults with individual methods; and not a comprehensive plan, obviously.
Not to say everything is all bad but there are many potential weakness out there, and some in the Bitcoin and crypto community like to know the edge cases of things.
I will also highlight some of the aspects of the Keyois Capsule which is a 'physical bitcoin'.
A physical Bitcoin is a cryptographic key pair, a physical key printed and affixed to what has always been before a coin. The first physical bitcoin coin was the Casascius coin, since then the world of physical bitcoin coins has blossomed as a fun part of the Bitcoin world.
We will focus on mediums relating to cold storage and not ones designed for more everyday use, but this applies to the seed you save to keep your everyday spending wallets safe and backed up.
We will assume you generated your keys securely and that you already have them on some medium. We will also have to ignore endpoint physical security because they can all be carried away the same. Remember your cell phone /hardware wallet/ computer client are only as good as where you put the backup seed phrase, which can be thought of as data much like the SK discussed below.
Written on a piece of paper
Printed on a piece of paper
On laminated paper
Engraved / etched/ ablated/ stamped on a piece of metal
Stored digitally on a computer
Stored digitally on CD, floppy disk, laserdisc, or mini-disc
Stored digitally on a flash drive
Backups are essential for digital data Computer code for performing operations can be corrupted in transfer or in operation. Special systems exist and procedures help data to last longer. For ideas, see this archive.gov page Remember to store in multiple locations. You can lose everything in single structure
A physical bitcoin coin
**What can solve most of these problems? A combination of good backup procedures and encryption. **
If you have permeant access to more than one location (people who live in big cities, without family or cars have a hard time with this) or have people you trust with your money (don't) then look into using some form of Multi-signature option.
The Keyois Capsule is a crypto piggy bank; it can be funded from the outside but you to break it open to get them out. You give me a BIP38 encrypted key pair (well the address not the public key) and I engrave it in this tamper evident and time resistant package. You still have to hold on to the pass phrase that allows you to decrypt it; that is however the same problem as all methods with BIP38 encryption. How to store this without having to trust anyone but still being assured of it's security?
  • Engraving, embossing, or stamping on a sheet of metal is one option; however the metals that are easiest to stamp are ones that melt in a house fire. They could be put in a glass jar that's filled with aerogel and buried. These is the best readily available option for most people but it really can be tedious. - This puts you back at anyone who can see it can steal it so dip in plastic dip, wrap in duct tape, bake in clay, encase in concrete, whatever just don't leave unencrypted keys visible!
  • The cryptosteel is another ready-made option
  • Have the words etched onto glass at home with off the shelf products; but be carful of this idea because the glass can shatter from impact and heat or even sudden temperature changes
  • Anodize the words yourself on a pieces of metal, there used to be a service to help use your home printer to print the words with some chemicals you can buy
  • Bake them in clay, then encase that in epoxy resin so it can't shatter. then paint the outside, in the future you can solvent the paint off and see the written seed
  • Use a combination of techniques to split the seed so that it is safe(because split and separated) and redundant (because backed up).
The most cost effective way for a 'normal' person (without their own land, without more than one location, and who cannot trust anyone else with their funds) to keep their backup seed/ secret key safe from damage from the elements would probably to buy a stamping kit and hammer and some stainless steel sheet or bar, Aluminium can be okay if you have the right alloy but better safe than sorry.
submitted by ProfBitcoin to Keyois [link] [comments]

Want some personalized vanity addresses for your currency of choice? Check out Vanity Pool

I run a small project called Vanity Pool, it lets you outsource generation of cool vanity addresses through a split-key address algorithm - this means that your private key and thus your money is secure, even though other people mined for your address. This also means that you can get some nice vanity addresses and not have to spend a lot of your GPU time mining for the address instead of mining for your coin of choice.
So if you want some cool vanity address, like DDogeWowAA2EFcGmipzDjQBYQFXiqC8QFs or 1PiachuEVn6sh52Ez7o6Fymvw54qvQ4RBm , head on over to https://vanitypool.appspot.com/ , request a pattern you wish created (shorter patterns area cheaper and take a lot less time to generate), put in a public key that you own (you will need to use it later), when asked for network prefix, put in the decimal version of your coin-specific net-byte. Afterwards, you will be requested to pay a bounty in BTC (creating coin-specific pool would make the mining power a lot smaller; miners prefer being paid in BTC). After the payment is confirmed, any miner connected to the pool will start looking for the solution to your pattern.
Once you have the solution, either use Casascius' Address Utility, or head on over to our online tool (use coin-specific hex NetByte and hex Prefix Byte). After that you can import your new vanity address to your client by going through those steps (example using Dogecoin client).
Have fun!
submitted by ThePiachu to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Dogecoin Wallet Import Format

Hi,
I'm trying to use the Bitcoin Address Utility to integrate some address generation in my C# app.
Unfortunately, my ignorance is getting the best of me. The utility generates addresses using a specified type (0 = bitcoin, 30 = dogecoin), and the public address resolves in dogechain eplorers but the Base58 string created from the private address starts with '5' and is 51 bytes, not 'Q' or 52 bytes, so I can't import them into my DOGE wallet.
What am I missing?
submitted by DarylMoore to dogecoindev [link] [comments]

Physical Bitcoin and OpenDime users face dilemma -- reveal key to dump BCash, or hodl both

You might not open up a Casascius just to get at the little bit of BCash inside, but a replacement OpenDime is just $15. Meaning if you held more than maybe $200 worth of bitcoin on your OpenDime it starts making economic sense to order a replacement OpenDime and just cash out the BCash ($BCH) on the old one.
Paper wallets don't require any seal to be broken to spend the BCash, however to not weaken the wallet's security you would not want to dump the $BCH yet hodl the $BTC yet (due to that spend transaction revealing the public key.)
Trezor has it all figured out for you.
What would be useful is what Satoshium would offer. It has the transferability of cash (in the same manner that OpenDime, for example, does), and the re-usability of a Trezor (as a funded Satoshium can be redeemed, then reset back to blank state for use in funding with a new address.) . Unfortunately, Satoshium is still at just the concept (white paper) stage.
submitted by cointastical to btc [link] [comments]

10BTC & 1BTC Casascius Coins - Physical Bitcoins All Bitcoin Address balance How To Crack BitCoin 2019 How to find wallet bitcoin address with balance 2018 Real 100% working Bitcoins Casascius physical bitcoin coins How to buy bitcoin on CEX.IO and send to external wallet ...

Each Casascius Bitcoin is a collectible coin backed by real Bitcoins embedded inside. Each piece has its own Bitcoin address and a redeemable "private key" on the inside, underneath the hologram. Some of my past products have included: ฿1 Casascius Coin: This is a solid brass coin. Each 1-bitcoin coin is about 1.125inch (28.6mm) in diameter (just bigger than a US quarter but smaller than a ... Some people might want a physical Bitcoin, especially since they're not being made anymore. Sell the Bitcoin 'contained' within the physical coin. Peel off the sticker on the back. Inside will be a code that lets you spend the Bitcoin. (I recommend using Blockchain.info as your e-wallet.) You can sell the Bitcoin online or locally. Coin that originated the crypto currency of BTC, or Bitcoin. Comes with 1x Silver 1oz. coin in coin capsule, display box, Certificate of Authenticity (COA), and 2x holograms so you can . trending Casascius Bitcoins Bitcoin . Casascius Bitcoins . Dec 14, 2017 DTN Staff. twitter. pinterest. google plus. facebook. Casascius Bitcoin: Coins World Ebay ... Gets one or more Bitcoin address known to belong to the merchant's wallet. These will be used for incoming Bitcoin transactions. Ideally, the terminal should cache a few of these, since printing an address doesn't need to be a network-dependent operation. From terminal to host: From host to terminal: The address Casascius aluminum coin with paper wallet built in. This is a great way to store your bitcoin offline made simple and easy to use by using a physical bitcoin wallet coin. The Bitcoin address shown on outside of coin, and the private keys are hidden underneath the hologram!Just scan the address on the back of coin to send your bitcoin to the coin address. Later if you want to spend the bitcoin ...

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10BTC & 1BTC Casascius Coins - Physical Bitcoins

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